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knoll light factory

Built by ILM’s Chief Creative Officer, John Knoll, Knoll Light Factory creates camera-inspired, photo-realistic lens flares for the visual effects and motion graphics pro. Knoll Light Factory comes with over presets designed for film, broadcast and motion graphics. Universe Knoll Light Factory EZ lets you quickly setup lens flares for use in motion graphics and visual effects. Use it to instantly add color, depth and excitement. May 28, - To create the Knoll Light Factory app, Red Giant worked very closely with John Knoll, chief creative officer at Industrial Light And Magic. Knoll.

The interface consists of the following: Click on options button to open. Here you'll pick all of the elements of the flare. From how much it glows around the center, the kind of glow, to spikes growing out from the center, to streaks flaring out, to faded shapes that would be caused by a real lens flare , to many others you can even create the look of a laser.

Each element can be added, or, if not liked, deleted. Each element has a full range of settings that can be individually manipulated for each element. These include color, angle, intensity and position the settings vary depending on the element type.

In the Lens Editor there is also a preview area so you can see the combination of effects you are creating. This is different from the individual brightness that you can apply to the elements individually in the Lens Editor. Determines where in the frame the flare is located. Just like other elements of this filter, it is keyframeable. Therefore, the flare can animate across the screen. This location can be entered with coordinates, or by simply clicking on the cross-hair and then selecting a place in the Canvas in FCP, or in the Comp Window in After Effects.

If a Location Layer is selected, then settings here will be ignored. Sets the overall color of the flare. In the Lens Editor, you can select the colors for individual elements of the flare. Determines the angle for the flare.

Location Layer: If you have a multi-layered video composition, you can select one of the video layers in this box. If there is a location layer selected, then any position included in the position boxes above will be ignored, and the filter will look to the location layer for placement position. This is very helpful if you wish a flare to track across screen during a shot i. The location layer must consist of something to track for this to work.

In the tutorials, John Knoll uses a white dot on a black background that animates across the screen. The flare will follow this path, no matter what layer the flare is applied. It also seems to be helpful to place this location layer on the bottom-most part of the composition. This way, the location layer is obscured by the other video tracks, but it stills controls the path of the flare. Obscuration Layer: If you have a multi-layered composition, and you want the flare to appear to go behind a foreground object, or appear from behind an object, then you need to make use of this featur.

Select a video layer in this box. This clip will now act as the layer that the effect hides behind, or appears from behind. This is a powerful feature of this filter. As an object starts to obscure the flare, the flare can be manipulated to look like it doesn't simply disappear, but gets gradually hidden. Light behaves differently than a solid object; the way it can look as though it bends around the edges of the object it is starting to be obscured by. The amount of this reaction at the edges can be adjusted by the Source Size.

Obscuration and Location Layer in AE select your video layer in these boxes To select a Location or Obscuration Layer for FCP, you will need to drop a video layer from the timeline on to one of these "wells". These wells are similar to wells used by other plug-ins or filters for FCP that use multiple video layers for their effects.

Obscuration Type: For a flare that would disappear behind a solid object, you would choose Alpha. For a flare that becomes partially obscured behind an object, and even takes on the color of the foreground object, then use RGB. John Knoll uses a sun shining through a multi-colored stained glass window in one tutorial to show an example of how this works.

The sun created here is a flare created by the filter. As the sun moves across the sky behind the stained glass, it "filters" through this opaque surface, taking on the color of the glass that is shining through!

It creates an incredible integrated effect. Source Size: Determines the size for the Obscuration Layer. The Knoll Light Factory plug-ins will work with a single video clip. But to get the richest effects, a several layer video composition works wonders. This can create effects that can blend with the elements of a shot.

Here, it seems best to work with at the least: Although a Location Layer and an Obscuration Layer can be applied, they don't seem to work. I contacted Pinnacle about this, and they verified my results. They mentioned that these features worked with previous versions of FCP, but apparently do not now.

They said that they would work on this. I hope that these things do get worked out, as it would make it much more functional in FCP. This demonstration comes from one of the tutorials included on the CD. Layer 1: The manual notes that John Knoll often applies the flare to a solid layer, instead of one of the video layers, giving more flexibility for the effect.

This can be easily done in After Effects by creating a black solid. Lay this solid in the time layout window on the top video layer of the comp. Apply the Light Factory filter to this clip. Then apply the Unmult filer to this clip. The Unmult filter comes with the Light Factory plug-ins.

When applied, this filter will create alpha information from any black pixels. Subsequently, anything that was previously black, is now transparent. It will maintain shades of grey as semi-transparent. As you can imagine, you can use this filter alone for all kinds of applications, not just for working with these flares. Layer 2: In this example, there is an additional foreground element. This layer is not essential to the comp. Layer 3: The foreground layer will work best if it is a separated element, such as a person or object filmed or taped against a blue-screen.

The foreground element can also be a graphic with an alpha channel, like text created in Photoshop. This foreground layer is then used as the obscuration layer on the solid clip with the flare. This clip would now be selected in the box for obscuration layer on the solid clip with the Knoll flare. Layer 4: The background layer will be the background of the comp.

Either a separately filmed background, a matte painting or any other type of graphic to be used as a background. Layer 5: The location layer can be created any number of ways. John Knoll used a white dot on a black background that animated across the screen.

He created this in Electric Image, but this can be created however you wish. This clip would now be selected in the box for Location Layer on the solid clip with the Knoll flare.

GPU OPTIMIZATION (NEW). Knoll Light Factory is now runs on the GPU. MOTION GRAPHICS & MORE. Use. Created by John Knoll, Photoshop co-creator and Star Wars effects guru, Knoll Light Factory is one of the industry's most popular motion graphics tools. It is most. A plug-in for Adobe After Effects and Premiere Pro CC +, Red Giant Knoll Light Factory provides 3D lens flares for motion graphics and VFX. It features.

Knoll light factory

The interface consists of the following: Click on options button to open. Here you'll pick all of the elements of the flare. From how much it glows around the center, the kind of glow, to spikes growing out from the center, to streaks flaring out, to faded shapes that would be caused by a real lens flare , to many others you can even create the look of a laser. Each element can be added, or, if not liked, deleted.

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